Golestan Palace

Golestan Palace

Golestan Palace: The oldest of the historic monuments in Tehran, the Golestan Palace (Palace of Flowers) belongs to a group of royal buildings that were once enclosed within the mud-thatched walls of Tehran’s Historic Arg (citadel). Some of its important places are as follow:

Shams-ol-Emareh Palace: The idea of building a tall structure came to Naser-ed-Din Shah before his first visit to Europe and from pictorial images of European buildings. The Monarch wanted a structure from which he could have panoramic views of the city. Designed by Mo`ayyer-ol-Mamalek, construction of the Shams-ol-Emareh began in 1865 and was completed two years later. The architect was Master Ali Mohammad Kashi.

Takht-e- Marmar: The spectacular terrace known as Takht-e- Marmar (Marble Throne) was built in 1806 by order of Fath Ali Shah-e- Qajar. Adorned by paintings, marble-carvings, tilework, stucco, mirrors, enamel, woodcarvings, and lattice windows; the throne embodies the finest of Iranian architecture. The Marble Throne is one of the oldest buildings of the historic Arg. The existing throne, which is situated in the middle of the terrace (Eyvan), is made of the famous yellow marble of Yazd Province.

Talar-e- Aineh (Hall of Mirror): It is the most famous of the Palace hall. This relatively small hall is famous for its extraordinary mirror work. The Hall was designed by Hãj Abd-ol-Hoseyn Me marbashi (Sani-ol-Molk). Yahyã Khăn Mo tamed-ol-Molk, the minister of architecture, acted as consultant to the designer.

Abyaz Palace: Completed in 1883, the Abyaz (White) Palace now houses one of the most interesting ethnological museums in Iran. There is a colorful exhibition of tradition Iranian costumes, as well as a folk art exhibition.

Emarat-e- Bãdgir (Building of the Wind Towers): was constructed during the reign of Fath Ali Shāh (circa 1805). The building underwent major renovations, including structural changes, during the reign of Nasser d-Din Shah. A watercolor rendering by Mahmud Khãn-e- Malek-osh-Sho ara depicts the original structure prior to renovations.
Talar-e- Bereliyãn (Hall of Brilliance): It was named so for it is adomed by the brilliant mirror work of Iranian artisans. The Hall was built by Naser-ed-Din Shãh to replace another hall called Talar-e- Bolur (Crystal Hall).

Talar-e- Zoruf: This building replaced the Narenjestãn Building in the north of Aj Hall or Sofreh Khaneh. All the chinaware that were dedicated to Qajar kings by the European kings were taken to this room and was arranged in show cases which were built for this purpose.
Talar-e- Aj (Hall of Ivory): It is a large hall used as a dining room. It was decorated with gifts presented to Naser-ed-Din Shah by European monarchs.

Talar-e- Almas (Hall of Diamonds): It is located in the southern wing of Golestãn Palace next to the Bãdgir Building. It is called Hall of Diamonds because of the exceptional mirror work inside the building.

Khavat-e- Karim Khani: Dating back to 1759, this building was a part of the interior residence of Karim Khan-e- Zand. The basic structure of the Khalvat-e-Karim Khani is similar to Takht-e-Marmar. Like the latter, it is a terrace (eyvãn). There is a small marble throne inside the terrace. The structure is much smaller than Takht-e-Marmar and it has much less ornamentation.

Special Museum: This building is located under the Salãm Hall or Museum. It is indeed a part of the first Iranian museum, which was built by Mohammad Ebrahim Khãn-e Me marbashi. Right now in addition to the gifts, some rare objects are kept in this museum, some of them are as follows: Helmet of Shah Esmail-e-Safavi, bow and arrows of Nader Shãh, armband of Fath Ali Shah, the collection of Qajar Seals, Aga Mohammad khan’s crown and a decorated ostrich egg.

Negar Khãneh: The original collection of the museum all is now scattered among Tehrãn’s many museums. However, the paintings of the royal court are now kept at the Golestãn Palace- with the European paints housed in the Howz Khãneh and the works of Iranian painters housed in the Negãr Khãneh. Meant to show the evolution of painting in Iran during the Qãjar era, the works of Iranian painters are exhibited in sections.

Talar-e- Salãm (Reception Hal): It was originally designed to be a museum. After the Takht-e-Tavus (Iranian’s famous Jeweled Peacock Throne) was moved to the Royal jewels collection at the Central Bank, this hall was designated to hold special receptions in the presence of the king, hence the name Talar-e Salam.

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